You are here: Home Abstract What is Left Behind: examining the fragments of community-driven livelihoods, infrastructure, governance, peacebuilding, and other projects in Aceh’s conflict-affected east coast and highlands

What is Left Behind: examining the fragments of community-driven livelihoods, infrastructure, governance, peacebuilding, and other projects in Aceh’s conflict-affected east coast and highlands

What is Left Behind: examining the fragments of community-driven livelihoods, infrastructure, governance, peacebuilding, and other projects in Aceh’s conflict-affected east coast and highlands


Bobby Anderson


Abstrak

Between 2006 and 2010, numerous community-driven development (hereafter CDD) projects were implemented in Aceh’s conflict-affected east coast and highlands communities: these projects were intended to create social capital, improve livelihoods, and support good governance processes through the comprehensive engagement of entire communities in determining and prioritizing village needs and aspirations. These projects often facilitated the community-driven creation of village development plans (Musyawarah Perencanaan Pembangunan or Musrenbang), and used those plans to ensure that community priorities informed the development plans of sub-district and district level government, especially relating to public services and budget appropriations.
However, no one has thought to measure what remains of these community-driven initiatives after the project cycle ends, and if any of the impacts were lasting. The author is currently undertaking research on the remains of these initiatives, especially regarding lasting impacts on household livelihoods and the inclusion, if any, of community development plans within district-level planning. Through case studies, the author is attempting to discover if these post-conflict development methodologies had any lasting impact on the lives of the communities involved.

You are here: Home Abstract What is Left Behind: examining the fragments of community-driven livelihoods, infrastructure, governance, peacebuilding, and other projects in Aceh’s conflict-affected east coast and highlands