You are here: Home Abstract The Memorialisation of the Victims in the Social Reconstruction of Communities in Post-Tsunami Japan: Memory,Religion and the State

The Memorialisation of the Victims in the Social Reconstruction of Communities in Post-Tsunami Japan: Memory,Religion and the State

The Memorialisation of the Victims in the Social Reconstruction of Communities in Post-Tsunami Japan: Memory, Religion and the State


S├ębastien Boret


Abstrak

This paper investigateshow the memorialisation of the dead might form a basis for the social recovery ofcommunities that have beendevastatedby natural disasters. On March 11 2011, the northeast region of Japan was hit by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and an annihilating tsunami which destroyed entire coastal cities, caused the death of overfifteen thousand individuals and left thousands of missing bodies. Grounded in ethnographic fieldwork, this presentationdiscusses the processes of memorialising the tragic event and its victims through tangible (memorial monuments) and intangible (ceremonies) acts of remembrance. In particular, this paper draws on my research on the first year memorial rituals and the subsequent edification of public memorial monuments for the dead in the cities of Higashimatsushima and Kamaishi. Following this overview, this presentation examines the politics surrounding the commemorations of the dead where communal, religious and governmental organisations intersect. This section will attempt to draw some comparative elements with memorialisation practices in post-disaster Banda Aceh. Looking beyond the disaster specifics of Japan and Indonesia, this paperconcludes with a reflection on the way in which in the (re)construction of memorycontributes towards social recovery in post-disaster human settlements.

 


You are here: Home Abstract The Memorialisation of the Victims in the Social Reconstruction of Communities in Post-Tsunami Japan: Memory,Religion and the State